Timber groyne renewal programme continues between Middle Chine and West Cliff zig-zag

Construction works to complete the timber groyne renewal programme, part of the Poole Bay beach management scheme, continues this autumn. This final phase will see three groynes at Middle Chine, Durley Chine and West Cliff zig-zag removed and replaced with four more evenly spaced groynes.

The contractors, Suttle Projects Ltd, will begin to prepare the site to de-construct and re-construct the groynes from 4 October 2021. The works are due to finish by the end of March 2022, subject to weather conditions and Covid-19 working arrangements. Planned works hope to be completed during normal working hours, however teams will work during the lowest tides on a rota system, so some work may occur outside daylight hours.

The scheme is designed to protect our coastline from erosion during extreme events and allows for sea level rise. The first phase of the £1.9m project started in October 2020, which saw the replacement of five old groynes with four new ones.

Councillor Mark Anderson, Cabinet Portfolio Holder for Environment, Cleansing and Waste, said: “The continuation of this work is crucial in protecting our local communities against coastal erosion and safeguards properties, highways and our local infrastructure for the next 100 years. It is part of the £50m Poole Bay Beach Management Scheme which by 2032 will see all life-expired groynes being renewed, another re-nourishment to top-up depleted beach areas and the repair and upgrade of Hengistbury Head Long Groyne.”

The promenade will remain open but for safety reasons, the length of beach between Middle Chine and West Cliff zig-zag will be fenced off during the works.

The sand can become very unstable when it is excavated around groynes. For this reason, all beach visitors during the duration of the works will be asked not to pass the construction zone along the water’s edge, even at low tide.

For more information- Timber Groyne renewal winter 2021/22 - Poole & Christchurch Bays Flood & Coastal Erosion Risk Management (twobays.net)

 

Posted on Monday 20 September 2021