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Bereavement during COVID-19

Dealing with bereavement and grief during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic can be extremely difficult and you may be unsure what options are available to you.

The government has given us guidance on how funerals can be conducted during the pandemic. We understand that many will find these stricter rules distressing, but we must all work together to protect your loved ones and our staff in these difficult circumstances. Your funeral director will be very helpful in guiding you through what is and what isn’t possible at this time.

Our Bereavement information is here to guide you through every aspect of the funeral process, and our team are here to provide you with clear and informative advice in order for you to make the right decisions for you and your loved ones.

Once the COVID-19 restrictions are lifted, you might like to consider arranging a memorial service. This type of formal or informal event can be very helpful in providing a ‘goodbye moment’ to cherish and remember your loved one, in the presence of family and friends.

What to do when someone dies during COVID-19 pandemic.

Coping with bereavement – support and advice

The death of a loved one in any circumstances can be devastating – let alone at this time of isolation and restriction. Bereavement can affect people in many different ways and it is normal for an array of emotions to kick in at different times throughout the grieving process.

NHS bereavement helpline

The bereavement support and information helpline is open 10am to 4pm, Monday to Friday and can provide you with practical support, guidance and advice during this difficult time.

Telephone: 0800 2600 400.

Stages of bereavement

It is recognised by doctors that there are four main stages of bereavement:

  1. Accepting that your loss is real
  2. Experiencing the pain of grief
  3. Adjusting to life without the person who has died
  4. Moving on (putting less emotional energy into grieving and channelling it into something else - or even better, something new).

Not everyone moves from one phase smoothly into the next and there is no set timescale for feelings to become less intense. It is a gradual process.

There is no right or wrong way to feel. If you can, talk to friends or family in your residence, or on the phone, or via web chats.

If this is not possible, visit our pages for advice and some details of other organisations that can provide you with further support.

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